Feds ease up on proposed trade restrictions

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The federal government is easing up on trade regulations that the marine industry says would have created a costly burden for U.S. manufacturers.

The proposed regulation, “10+2”, would have required importers to report additional security filing data on cargo destined for the United States 24 hours prior to the cargo shipping date, before much of the data would be available. This would have created supply chain delays and higher implementation costs for U.S. marine manufacturers, according to the National Marine Manufacturers Association.

“ ‘10+2’ had the potential to significantly damage the boating industry by restricting trade from moving freely during a time when so many in our industry are already struggling as a result of the economic climate,” NMMA president Thom Dammrich said in a statement.

After receiving input from NMMA and other industry groups, U.S. Customs and Border Protection modified the proposed rule to make it more flexible. The rule now provides an interim six-month test period wherein the best possible scenario for providing data elements can be determined. As a result, manufacturers will submit data elements that are the most difficult to collect as soon as they are available.

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