NMMA takes ethanol fight to the Web

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The National Marine Manufacturers Association has set up an online action alert to allow interested parties to submit comments to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, encouraging them to deny the petition to increase ethanol blend levels in gasoline to E15.

The comment period, which began this week, ends May 21.

A pro-ethanol lobbying organization called Growth Energy and 54 ethanol manufacturers recently submitted a formal petition to EPA requesting a waiver under the Clean Air Act to increase ethanol blend levels in gasoline up to 15 percent (E15) by volume.

As is required by law, the EPA published a Notice for Comment in the Federal Register.

“There is enormous political pressure on federal agencies to allow a high blend level despite well-known problems with mid-level ethanol gasoline,” NMMA legislative director Matthew Dunn said in a letter to industry stakeholders.

“We are asking all interested parties to submit comments to EPA arguing that the waiver petition be denied,” he added. “Although NMMA has been working with EPA and DOE to initiate testing on marine engines and equipment and has formally submitted a test plan for our sector, there has been no testing to date by any federal agency on the impacts of mid-level ethanol blends on marine products.

“As you all know, marine engines are designed and certified to run on not more than E10, the current legal allowable blend limit,” he added. “Increasing the limit will likely bring marine engines out of compliance with federal clear-air laws, damage marine engines due to higher temperatures, pose safety risks to boaters and sportsmen and likely mean warranties will be voided.”

The NMMA is developing a template for comments to EPA, and encourages organizations to send comments directly to EPA. In the meantime, those interested can click here to send comments.

Comments

6 comments on “NMMA takes ethanol fight to the Web

  1. William D. Matthews

         I have been boating the great lakes since 1985.  The only way my family could afford to boat was to own 20 year old boats.  On the great lakes there is a large number of perfectly good boats in that age bracket.  I currently own a boat that was manufactured in 1985.  The boat runs perfectly and fits our needs.  This boat was not designed to run on any ethanol gas blends.  Leaks, swollen hoses and ruined tanks can be the result of ethanol blending in marine gas.  My largest concern is for the safety of my children and grandchildren on a boat where the fuel system is compromised by the addition of ethanol into marine gas.  Give us a break.  The actual amount of fuel used for pleasure marine is but a drop in the U S total fuel total.  When my boat explodes in flames as result of ethanol, I hope I have a few tree huggers aboard!

  2. Robert Bernard

    Please, how many more boaters do you want stranded because of
    ethanol blended fuels!  The damage it causes must be considered.
    Marine FUELS MUST BE EXEMPT from adding ETHANOL PERIOD!  Use the CORN for things that we all enjoy-POP CORN!

  3. Bill Cockerham

    Owning a marine service shop, I can tell you first the problems that even E-10 is causing. Fuel pump diaphragms comprimised, fuel hoses seperating causing fuel starvation and engine failures. Water/fuel contamination.

  4. Capt. Don

    The very fact that it takes more energy to create E-10 then it produces should be reason enough not to continue to forcing it down the throats of people that know better than to use something that destroys fiberglass, rubber hoses, and marine engines.   The untold heartaches and danger for the boating public that the corn lobby is forcing upon then is arrogance beyond control.
    Please bring some old time common sense back to the agencies that want to control our lives.  In tough economic times why would anyone want to press for more costly measures for something that has not been proven to be of any benefit except to the corn lobbies?
     

  5. Hugh Vanderheul

    Corn is one of the lower yielding ethanol crops. But the farm lobby has prevailed and now its huge stockpiles are gone.
    Environmentalist, ever in the foreground to tell the world how and what to do, are nowrethinking the “benefits”.
    Government, wanting to look green and proactive, was presented a “made for succes and progress” solution. They didn’t read any of this either?
    Follow the money, who is getting rich of this? What about alternate base materials that supposedly yields twice the ethanol vs corn and require much less water and not take food to convert it into fuel?
    Perhaps we should have answers to all these questions, before this huge mistake gets further compounded. EPA, Ethanol Proponent Association?

  6. JMR

    Ethanol fuel in any engine is a very bad thing because of the damage it causes. Those that are for adding it do so to make great profits regardless of the effects it has with the working man that is just trying to get by and have some enjoyment for his family, that is if he can have a job.
    First it was the removal of the lead with pure disregard of the results and/or consequences of the internal damage of the engines. The lead was in the fuel first as a cushioning agent for the valves and second it also contained the preservative that kept the volitility of the fuel up so that ALL engines would not self distruct internally. Next it was the issue of adding 10% alchol (ethanol / methanol) under the premise that it was to reduce the carbon monoxide output of an engine and to help keep the pump price of a gallon of gas down.
    Now they want to add even more garbage to the fuel, 15% ethanol, so that our engines have an even shorter life span and the fat-cats get fatter (richer). If they want to add this garbage to the fuel then I vote that they pay the cost to replace or upgrade everybody’s engine so that it will last.
                                                 Very Concerned Individual.

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