Gulf oil spill reaches Florida’s ‘loop current’

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Federal officials confirmed oil from the Gulf has reached the so-called loop current, which could send it around South Florida and into the Atlantic Ocean.

The National Oceanic Atmospheric and Atmospheric Administration reported Wednesday “a small portion” of the oil slick resulting from the Deepwater Horizon’s explosion last month has reached the current, according to media reports.

NOAA administrator Jane Lubchenco said once oil hits the current, it could reach the Florida Strait in eight to 10 days. If oil enters the current, persistent offshore winds could bring it to Florida’s shore, she added.

Evaporation and natural dispersion will reduce the oil volume significantly in the current, however, changing the nature of the crude and transforming it mainly into tar balls, Lubchenco added.

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Comments

14 comments on “Gulf oil spill reaches Florida’s ‘loop current’

  1. VS RAPNASHALDI

    We must accept that the environement in the gulf is permanently damaged. It is better we accept this. It is ruined and lost. Forget about it.

  2. Doug

    We MUST NOT accept or forget about it.  We MUST make sure those responsible pay and it MUST never happen again!  The environment is damaged but has survived worse.

  3. jim m

    How’s that drill baby drill thingy goin fer ya?
    What a shame. The Keys, it’s reefs, our beaches and tourism. A true disaster in the making.

  4. Andrew

    We love our boats, automobiles and lifestyles…. However, it all comes at a potential cost… However, when we way the cost vs benefits, some investments are not worth the risk for the multitude of silent stakeholders…
    Our greed for energy has led to another manmade disaster.  When will we learn to take better care of our habitat?  If not for ourselves, but for the long term survival of life on earth!
    Fortunately for living creatures, the earth has an incredible and wonderful regeneration ability.  We may do harm to the environment in the short term, however “Mother Nature” performs her miracles over time.
     As for VS Rapnashaldi, go visit Nagasaki, Japan or Blight Reef in Prince William Sound.   You would do well to open your eyes….. Maybe you would do better to redirect your talents toward finding a better way to produce energy?

  5. Ed

    A tragedy, for sure, but the Gulf permanently damaged?  Hardly.
    There are risks in harnessing all forms of energy, and of course every effort should be taken to mitigate the risks, and learn from mistakes.  Conservation is great, but doing without is simply not a choice.

  6. bunny huggers r us

    It was bound to happen. No one will argue that this is a true tragedy and will undoubtedly affect the ecosystem for some time. But it truly amazes me at how we can instantly say, “Unacceptable, someone must pay, we cannot allow this to happen”. What a joke….. Opinions are like rectums, everyone has one. As my grandfather used to say, now the “bunny huggers” are all up in arms.
    Here is a though, how many of us are willing to give up our v-8, boat towing, vehicles in the efforts to reduce our nation’s dependence on oil? Or what about our other toys that require petroleum based fuels. Consumers demand it and all our lifestyles require it. Anyone willing to walk to work or ride a bike?
    I am pretty sure that the owner’s of Deep Horizon didn’t get up one morning and say, hey let’s blow up a rig today to see what happens. These guys must be losing millions. We can either be a part of the problem or a part of the solution. Who all is ready to open their wallets and donate in the cleanup efforts? Not too many would be my guess………

  7. Joe Public

    Just a reminder for all who are bashing the “Drill Baby Drill” comments. Remember the Exon Valdes was our worst oil spill. It was not our drilling. It was forign oil. We are at risk weather we drill here or rely on foregn oil.
    It’s real eazy to point to the SUVs, Boats, etc… But the fact is oil is everywhere in our lives. It’s not just transportation. It’s in our furniture, computers, carpets, dinning utensils, tupper where type containers, plastic bagies, clothing, make up, deodorants, and on and on…. It is everywhere!
    It’s not that the oil is evil. With out it…we are a different world.
    It’s a tremendious challenge that has not yet been met when it comes to finding Feasible and Viable alternatives. I hate to dampen anyone’s optimism but Solar, Wind, Hydroelectricity, Geothermal, Hybrid and Electric Cars, etc. are not ready for market yet. Don’t get me wrong…we should continue to develop these and other alternatives… but until they can compete in Efficiency and Cost compared to what we use today…well… you can’t just stop using oil.
    We should impliment better safe guards in dealing with these kinds of problems. We need to be able to Cap the Well at the oceans floor at any point durring the drill or production phase. We need better containment and clean up programs in place!
    Please remember as horrific as it may seem, these acidents don’t happen very often. We don’t base Policy on the…It may occur ”once in a life time event”. We implement Methods and Procedures to Prevent, Minimize or Contain.
    Lets not bash or play Politics…Lets look for Feasible and Viable Solutions.

  8. Dave

    There is enough oil in the north part of Alberta, Canada in the sands ( OIL SANDS )  to supply the US so why are we risking the enviroment of an ocean ?

  9. Joe Public

    Bunny Huggers R US has it right except you wont be riding the same kind of bike that is in your garage. The one in your garage has RUBBER TIRES and Seat and Handle Grips. All Petrolium Products.
    You wont want to walk either…Your walking or running shoes are also made of Petrolium Products.
    Don’t bother reaching for that cell phone because the phone and the cord you plug in to charge it…you guessed it Petrolium. Not to mention the enviromental nightmare of those darn Battries in the phone.
    I hope you don’t get lost because your computer and Map Quest won’t be here either without oil.
    Don’t think you can just revert back to using a Thomas Guid for directions. remember we where cutting down all the rain forests to make those darn things.
    Think about it and think about real solutions!

  10. bunny huggers r us

    Well stated Joe Public….. The point I was attempting to make is that we as a society are all too eager to pass judgment and assess blame, often without the benefit of all the information. This oil spill is an unplanned, unintended accident. Every industry has an obligation to use preventative measures and safeguards but the unexpected will happen at some point. We should concern ourselves with a go forward plan to deal with the spill and not asses blame.

  11. Flitzr

    I thought this was a Trades only article It’s hard to believe some of these posts are from industry folks…. by the way no oil from spill in Florida keys…most likely the tarballs found there are from Chicom oil rig off of Cuba!!!! Where is the UN outrage over the Chicoms drilling in waters 90 miles from USA shores???

  12. sammy54

    The time for revenge will come, but first learn the lessons of the disaster. This points out the problems with lack of oversight and regulations.  Self regulation is no regulation. No rig should be permitted to start operation until a thoroughj inspection has been accomplished and an operational certificate issued by a DISINTERESTED third party –read government.  Not the owner/operator, not an owners classification society, but the representatives of the public.  MMS was directed to withdraw regulations, now they will be the first heads to fall-not the politicians that ordered the regs withdrawn.

  13. Joe Public

    Let’s take a common sense approach to this Very Infrequent Accident.
    We should implement safe guards to try and prevent this from happening again.
    Havin gsaid that I’m not sure the Government is the right entity. Example: Look at what the Army Corps of Engineers is doing right now regarding this spill. Rather than letting those who appear to be in harms way build a barrier to help prevent the oil from reaching shallower waters and effecting the shore line. The Government Agency is cuaght up in Red Tape. The Goverment can’t react quick enough in these types of situations. They want to study the issue and try and find some way to mitigate or negociate for something. That is their nature. Common sense and quick action for something “Out of the Box” is not what they do. Because they are an Government Agency and have Policies that are based out of Fear. Fear of conflicts of interest, Some one getting special treatment or a promotion over someone who has been there longer…In other words there is No Incentive for these people to think. There is now Bonus for thinking. Only a deterrant to being held accountable to a diision. It’s much easier and safer to not make a decision.
    The Oil Company hsa all the insentive in the world to be successful. They have share holders who are looking for returns on investment. Not this huge loss.
    It’s a shame that this has happened but let’s not rush to creat more Goverment control. Let’s not just point fingers at the Oil Co. Remember we all use it. We can’t function without it (YET) and when you start getting all sympathetic towards the Turtles and other wildlife being effected on shore remember the Army Corps has been preventing the permitting of the trenching and barriers to help prevent this. 
    I Love the ocean and all it’s glory. It’s my life!
    Let’s please not over react.

  14. Joe Public

    Dear Sammy54,
    Please remember that we do have oversight and regulations that have worked for decades. When was the last problem of this type in the United States?
    These companies do go through a permitting process.
    We need to include the ability to Cap a Well at any point durring the Drilling Phase as well as the Production Phase.
    We also need a better plan for containment and reaction time to the unforeseen accident. Because there will be another accident of some type. Weather it’s Drilling or the Shipment of oil.

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