Skip to main content

Carl Cramer talks about his retirement plans

Carl Cramer wants to use his three wooden boats.

“I want to get back to doing the things I used to derive a lot of enjoyment from and just haven’t had time to do them,” Cramer told Trade Only Today. “I’m going to go sailing and powerboating every day. No wind today? Powerboat. Wind’s coming? Sailboat.”

Cramer announced Tuesday that after 26-1/2 years he will retire from Maine-based Professional BoatBuilder and WoodenBoat magazines.

Boating every day — in Maine?

“So maybe I’ll do things I’ve always wanted to do, like take the powerboat down the ICW — the Intracoastal Waterway — but maybe not,” Cramer said. “This is all brand-new in concept, so I really haven’t thought it out very much. I want to build a shop and some boats.”

Cramer says he wants to build on the skills acquired in the last two-plus decades and that Ankle Deep, the last boat Uffa Fox designed, at age 74, will be among his first boatbuilding projects.

“I’m going to build boats again for my own personal enjoyment,” Cramer said. “Prior to coming here, I was engaged in a series of failures as a yacht designer, a boatbuilder and a boat repairer. WoodenBoat picked me up out of the gutter and gave me a job, a career, a family and a life. So now I hope to have the skills to build and design better boats.”

In an announcement Cramer sent out Tuesday, he thanked readers for “loyal support over the 24-plus years we've been publishing ProBoat and the 22 years we've been producing IBEX. Surely I'll be seeing you at IBEX and METS next year, and of course at Vripack Design's Pecha Kucha event on Nov. 17 in Amsterdam.”

Cramer was quick to point out that he is retiring, not vanishing.

“I’m proud of having worked with an exceptional group of people who I consider to be my family, and that’s not going to disappear by my retiring. I live one mile away,” Cramer told Trade Only. “We’re an independent company and we all take pride in that. We strive to put out the best product and services for our respective industries. That’s what I’m proud of, to be part of this family.”

Related

1_AdobeStock_175388620

Clearing the Waterways

In Florida, in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian, it was estimated that there were 6,000 derelict boats in southwest part of the state. In most cases, boat owners don’t know resources are available to remove them because until recently there weren’t many.

1_AdobeStock_40421038

A Window on the World

Inflation, supply-chain kinks and the continuing war in Ukraine continue to be serious concerns, but numerous companies with a global presence for exports are reporting optimism at the start of 2023.

1_BRP

BRP Announces Mexico Production Facility

The $165 million plant will open in early 2025 in Chihuahua and create up to 1,300 jobs while bolstering production capabilities.

1_COAST. GUARD.FOUNDATION

C.G. Foundation Announces Scholarships

The program each year awards more than $500,000 to qualifying children of active duty, active duty reserve and retired Coast Guard members.

PROPSPEED-HIRES

Propspeed Expands U.S. Sales Team

Josh McGuire and Cole Barone were named regional sales managers for the Northeast and West Coast.

NEWPORT-IMPACT

Newport Boat Show Had $26.1M Impact

The September show drew more than 40,000 attendees last year, with boat sales estimated at $35 million to $40 million.

AdobeStock_182031788

Consumers Feel a Bit Better

A key measure of U.S. consumer confidence rose in December as the economy added 223,000 jobs, the smallest gain in two years. The Conference Board reported that its Consumer Confidence Index rose to 108.3 from 101.4 in November.

1_AdobeStock_272924647

How the ABYC Creates Standards

Standards are a full-time mission for the ABYC that goes beyond simply putting out a new supplement every July. As an organization built on a tradition of common-sense and real-world experiences, the ABYC works on standards development year-round with its Project Technical Committees.

1_5d02b934eb29f602144abe88

Year Three of Five

Fear of an impending exodus, especially with concerns about a looming economic recession, has leaders at the MRAA, the National Marine Manufacturers Association and the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation urging the industry to start focusing immediately on improving customer service as the primary way to retain these boaters.