Luxury reigns at ‘super’ site

New this year at Yachts Miami Beach was Superyachts Miami at Island Gardens Deep Harbour marina on Watson Island, where about 18 superyachts were berthed away from the crowds that descended on Collins Avenue and Virginia Key.
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The largest of the superyachts on display at Deep Harbour on Watson Island was Silver Fast. The inter-national brokerage firm Burgess offered the yacht, which carries a price tag of $90 million.

The largest of the superyachts on display at Deep Harbour on Watson Island was Silver Fast. The inter-national brokerage firm Burgess offered the yacht, which carries a price tag of $90 million.

New this year at Yachts Miami Beach was Superyachts Miami at Island Gardens Deep Harbour marina on Watson Island, where about 18 superyachts were berthed away from the crowds that descended on Collins Avenue and Virginia Key. Affluent brokerage clients from that rarefied world where a price tag of tens of millions for a yacht is no big deal arrived by private shuttle to tour the offerings here.

The largest and most luxurious of the yachts at Deep Harbour was Silver Fast, a 252-foot silver beauty selling for $90 million. “She’s very efficient, very eco-friendly, very fast,” says Rick Morales, senior sales broker for Burgess, a brokerage with offices in Miami, New York, London, Monaco, Singapore and seven other locations.

Built in western Australia by the German-owned SilverYachts, Silver Fast tops out at 27 knots, cruises at 20 to 22 and can voyage 4,500 miles at 18 knots without refueling. She recently motored from Australia to Europe in 21 days with just one fuel stop.

“She’s pretty impressive,” says Morales.

Attendance at Superyachts Miami was by invitation-only, that invitation typically coming from a broker. “It’s very relaxed here, very convenient, far from the crowds,” says Morales. The 50-slip marina, the first stage of a billion-dollar resort project that includes two hotel towers, 105 fractional living units, 18 restaurants, cafes and nightclubs, and 60-plus shops, has a lounge, restrooms, outdoor dining and a cocktail deck that overlooks the water and offers a captivating view of Miami’s skyline.

The marina, which can accommodate an 18-foot draft inside the harbor and a 25-foot draft outside, has opened the Collins Avenue show to larger yachts whose draft was too deep to go up Indian Creek, says Morales.

“We specialize in larger yachts,” he says. “We always had a problem with draft getting into the Collins Avenue part of the show. We’re very happy with this setup.”

This article originally appeared in the April 2016 issue.

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