METS 2015: Two companies share DAME Design Award - Trade Only Today

METS 2015: Two companies share DAME Design Award

The DAME Design Award went to joint winners for the first time in its 25-year history at the Marine Equipment Trade Show in Amsterdam.
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Representatives of Spinlock and Humphree celebrate today after the companies were named joint overall winners of the DAME Design Award at the Marine Equipment Trade Show.

Representatives of Spinlock and Humphree celebrate today after the companies were named joint overall winners of the DAME Design Award at the Marine Equipment Trade Show.

The DAME Design Award went to joint winners for the first time in its 25-year history at the Marine Equipment Trade Show in Amsterdam.

Jury chairman Bill Dixon presented the overall DAME Award to the Lume On LED light from Spinlock and the Electric Stabilizing Fin & Interceptor System from Humphree. The award was announced during the opening ceremony today of METS at the Amsterdam RAI Exhibition and Convention Center.

In something of a twist, compared with every previous Dame Design Award, the jury was stalemated when it came to deciding an overall winner between one of the lowest-priced products in the room and one of the more complex entries. The decision was to break the tradition of having just one entry take the top prize and celebrate the 25th anniversary by naming joint overall winners.

“The DAME judging process is unique in that all submissions are physically studied by the 10-person jury in person,” Sarah Westdijk, product manager of the maritime domain at RAI Amsterdam, in a statement.

“This meticulous process allows them to see, feel, try and test the products in each category — a major task, as there were 133 entries for this year’s award. The best then went through to a second round and were subjected to even greater scrutiny before a winner was named per category. In the final round the jury then selected the two joint winners.”

Click here for the full report and list of award winners.

METS’ keynote speaker was Peter Sander, manager of emerging technologies and concepts at Airbus Industries. His talk about how 3D printing is set to revolutionize the marine equipment industry focused on the opportunities and challenges that additive layer manufacturing offers for the future of design and industrial production.

Sander showed images of his own classic yacht from the 1960s, which he has restored himself and enjoyed sailing for the past 20 years. Moving swiftly from past through present to the future, he explained how 3-D printing has experienced remarkable growth during the last three years.

“3-D printing is set to change a great many business models, and everyone needs to speed up their research into this technology,” he said, citing examples such as the bionic bridge being built in Amsterdam by robots, gold pens in the United Kingdom and even the James Bond car in the latest movie.

“The fact that the FAA is now certifying engine parts made with 3-D printing proves beyond doubt that authorities recognise ALM as a solid technology for the future. It offers weight savings of between 30 to 35 percent, a reduction in tooling costs of as high as 90 percent, much faster production times and a far greater degree of creative freedom.”

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