Chrysler, Eminem and Discover Boating - Trade Only Today

Chrysler, Eminem and Discover Boating

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If a picture is worth a thousand words, what about three videos? You’ll have to be the judge of that.

There is more than a whiff of nostalgia in the air in the first ad, for the Chrysler 300, which is shown against a backdrop of active outdoor lifestyles, particularly boating. Is that really 1971? It’s not the music I remember, but it is an interesting look at how automobiles, the hot new options of the day and the boating lifestyle were marketed.

With its electric sunroof, cassette stereo that plays and records, luxurious high-back seats and advanced fuselage styling, the Chrysler 300 carries a “typical” American family through a busy day. Horseback riding, sailing, trailer boating, water-skiing and scuba diving.

I watched the old Chrysler ad for the first time last spring after the Wheels blog in The New York Times brought it to my attention. The writer suggested viewers create a little YouTube “mashup” by putting the 1971 ad on mute while opening a second browser window and playing the “Imported From Detroit” Super Bowl ad for the Chrysler 200 with its edgy instrumental version of Eminem’s “Lose Yourself.” The writer recommends you start the Eminem ad at about the 40-second mark, when the music really takes off.

Whether you mash up or not, the “Imported From Detroit” ad is worth a look. Luxury marketing against a powerful storyline.

The last video is Discover Boating’s inviting “Welcome to the Water” piece. This is how you reach out and grab potential new members of the tribe in 2011. I know that face.

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