For the Record: NMMA-U.S. partnership offers export resources

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The National Marine Manufacturers Association announced a partnership with the U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service in April to create a formalized program that gives NMMA members improved access to international trade resources offered by the federal government.

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The announcement was made during the American Boating Congress.

The New Market Export Initiative was developed to assist manufacturers as they expand export sales. As a participating partner, NMMA members have access to help develop contacts for business in foreign markets and assistance in securing export financing, guarantees and credit insurance.

Also, help is available for members about how to comply with regulatory and documentation requirements. Some of the services are available at no charge; others, tailored for a company’s specific needs, carry a fee.

“It is increasingly important to make marine manufacturing a global initiative,” NMMA president Thom Dammrich said. “The NMEI program will give our members the tools they need to be successful outside U.S. borders and help us all continue in our quest to make recreational boating the preferred choice in recreation.”

Florida builder honored for export success

Hann Powerboats, a small builder in Florida’s Manatee County, garnered national attention as the only Florida company and one of just eight nationwide that the U.S. Department of Commerce recognized in the 2011 annual report that the agency’s trade promotion arm produced.

Led by Hann’s recent $400,000 sale of military-style powerboats to a company from Nigeria, the local builder was featured by the Commerce Department for its exports, a segment of the business that has thrived during the last two years.

“We have some really good things happening,” owner Russell Hann said. “We have some momentum now.”

Hann Powerboats’ customers include the Air Force, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Navy and private entities. The builder also recently announced three new 2012 recreational models — the Blue Lightning 32 power cat, the Threadfin 24 Center Console and the 13 Nano. Hann builds what it calls the “biggest center console on the market,” the Hann 50 Center Console.

HamiltonJet marks production milestone

Waterjet manufacturer HamiltonJet said in April that it reached a significant production milestone with the completion of its 10,000th HJ212 waterjet model.

“The first HJ212 was built in February 1995 and was later fitted into a New Zealand-built sprint racing boat sponsored by HamiltonJet and Shell. Serial number 10,000 HJ212 is being installed into an all-new, 23-foot Jetcraft 2375 V-8-powered jet boat. The majority of HJ212s in between have been sold in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. and Canada, with many others going to jet boats built in New Zealand and Australia,” HamiltonJet publicity officer Tony Kean said in a statement.

“HJ212 waterjets have also been installed into boats operating in the U.K., Africa, Nepal, Bhutan, Russia, Turkey, Mexico, Chile, China and many other countries where river conditions require the shallow draft, safety and maneuverability only waterjet propulsion can provide,” he added.

ABYC names new president

The American Boat and Yacht Council named John Adey president of the boating standards organization during the board of directors’ annual meeting.

“With John Adey at the helm, ABYC is in extremely capable hands,” board chairman George Bellwoar said in a statement. “In his three months as interim president he has proven his ability to manage a host of projects critical to boating standards development and education. As president of the organization, his priority will now be moving forward the group’s initiatives in boating safety, professional development and education.”

Adey has served with ABYC since 2002 — first in the technical department, then as technical director, vice president and interim president. As technical director of the 4,000-member non-profit organization, he managed major boating safety grants from the Coast Guard and all ABYC boating standards development for the United States and internationally.

Prior to joining ABYC he owned and operated a marine supply and fishing tackle business in New Jersey with his wife, Lauri. He has also been involved in marina management and brokerage services.

Kannad AIS device gains FCC approval

Kannad Marine announced that its SafeLink R10 SRS was formally approved for sale in the United States by the Federal Communications Commission.

The world’s first personal AIS device, which was introduced at the Miami International Boat Show in February, also was named the Overall Winner of the 2012 Pittman Innovation Awards.

Intended to be attached to a life jacket and activated by people in difficulty at sea, the R10 uses both GPS and Automatic Identification System technology to send structured alert messages containing precise location information to AIS equipment onboard the vessel that the person has come from and other AIS-equipped vessels within about a 4-mile radius.

ABC reception raises $26,000 for BoatPac

The annual BoatPAC reception, held during the recent American Boating Congress, collected more than $26,000 in PAC contributions.

The National Marine Manufacturers Association said the event was a “huge success,” with 20 members of Congress in attendance.

The NMMA’s BoatPAC goal for 2012 is $125,000.

Soundings mourns fishing columnist

Timothy “Tim” Coleman, a Rhode Island-based writer and expert on fishing who had written a monthly angling column for Trade Only’s sister publication, Soundings, since 2003, died May 3 of what appears to be natural causes.

Coleman, 65, split his time between Westerly, R.I., and the Florida Keys, fishing and writing about his outings and sharing insights gained from a lifetime of fishing.

In addition to writing for Soundings, Coleman served as managing editor of the New England edition of The Fisherman magazine from 1974-2001, wrote a column for the New London, Conn.-based The Day newspaper and published eight books on fishing. He also contributed to the publications “Salt Water Sportsman” and “Boating World.”

He was well-liked and well-respected within the industry and fishing community, and news of his death spread quickly in an appropriate spot, the forum section of the Stripers Online website.

“The sport lost a big supporter and enthusiast. He was certainly an important figure and a savvy angler. He will be missed by many,” one posting read.

Texas marina reopens after 2008 hurricane

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Destroyed by Hurricane Ike in 2008, Bayland Marina outside Houston in the Upper Galveston Bay celebrated its grand reopening April 5 with a flag-raising ribbon-cutting ceremony.

“People in Baytown, Texas, had waited three and a half long years for this day,” parks and recreation director Scott Johnson said. “Bayland is the only marina in the area, so when the marina was destroyed, local boaters had to move their boats to locations outside Baytown.”

The new marina features floating concrete docks from Bellingham Marine that are designed to withstand an 18-foot storm surge. Twenty-inch freeboard, storm surge protection, upgraded power and full utility services at the slip are among the features of Bayland’s new facility.

N.Y. company offers coating alternative

A small upstate New York chemical company owned by an amateur competitive sailor is bidding for a share of the $4 billion global market for marine coatings with an environmentally friendly alternative that the company says also saves energy by reducing friction between the hull and the water.

“I think this is where the market is going,” said Duane Palmateer, president of Saratoga Springs, N.Y.-based Greenfield Manufacturing, during a press conference in April at the company’s Geyser Road plant.

The company, which focuses its coatings primarily on the commercial and high-performance racing boat markets, received more than $340,000 in assistance from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority for its product, HullSpeed.

A proprietary blend of epoxy (for strength) and silicone (for slipperiness), the material can be brushed or sprayed over any vessel, from a kayak to an ocean-going freighter. It dries like paint to a hardened shell, and the company says it has no toxic metals or biocides.

Family buys back DuraCraft brand

The Ward family, builder of War Eagle aluminum boats, reacquired DuraCraft. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Bill and Chick Ward established DuraCraft in 1945, but the family sold the business in 1984. Since then, the DuraCraft name has been bought and sold multiple times.

In 1992, a third generation of Wards — Mike and John Ward — decided to keep the family’s boatbuilding tradition alive by starting War Eagle Boats. After forming a partnership with Ducks Unlimited in the late 1990s, War Eagle became a premium watercraft for duck hunters across the Southeast.

In 2011, DuraCraft was sold in a liquidation proceeding, giving the Ward family the opportunity to buy back the DuraCraft name.

“We were given a chance to buy back the DuraCraft name started by my grandfather and we jumped on it,” Team Ward Inc. president Mike Ward said in a statement. “At one time, the DuraCraft brand stood as the pinnacle of quality aluminum products in the marine industry and we at Team Ward look forward to restoring the Ward family’s rich heritage of customer satisfaction to the DuraCraft name.”

METS plans to upgrade marina equipment showcase

The Marina Equipment Pavilion, one of the three product-based pavilions at the Marine Equipment Trade Show, is being relaunched and relocated for METS 2012 to enhance its identity and provide space for future growth.

METS takes place Nov. 13-15 in Amsterdam.

“We have been analyzing ways of increasing the profile of marina equipment suppliers at METS and for enhancing educational and social networking opportunities for marina-specific exhibitors and visitors for several years since first introducing a Marina Showcase at METS in 2001,” METS senior product manager Irene Dros said in a statement.

“The formula we are now putting together will greatly sharpen our focus on this all-important sector and is spurred on by Amsterdam RAI’s recently confirmed partnership with the International Council of Marine Industry Associations to co-organize its World Marina Conference series of events,” she added.

The Marina Equipment Pavilion 2012 will move to a more central location in the Europe Foyer and have its own adjacent seminar theater, the Marina Stage, with a bar and free catering for pavilion exhibitors and their guests.

This article originally appeared in the June 2012 issue.

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