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The man who sold hot dogs

I don’t know about you, but I’m getting pretty tired of TV reporters and presidential candidates trying to convince us the economy offers us less opportunity than a Somalian smuggler. And, while we’re at it, let’s hear it for those so-called economists (cough, cough) that claim the economy could tank at any minute.

Of course, the claim does hold water that this recovery has moved at a glacial pace. Still, while that continues to test our patience in the marine industry, it would be a mistake to let those who speak negatively impact our industry’s overall positive outlook. Our sales are continuing to grow.

So I’m reminded today of “The Man Who Sold Hot Dogs.” I don’t know who wrote it or how we came across it, but it’s something we have referred to in our home many times through the years.

Let me share its real-life message with you:

There was a man who lived by the side of the road and sold hot dogs.

He was hard of hearing so he had no radio. He had trouble with his eyes so he read no newspapers. But he sold good hot dogs.

He put up a sign on the highway telling everyone how good they were. He stood on the side of the road and cried: “Buy a hot dog, Mister?” And people bought.

He increased his meat and bun orders. He bought a bigger stove to take care of his growing trade.

He finally got his son home from college to help him out. But then something happened.

His son said: “Father, haven’t you been listening to the radio? Haven’t you been reading the newspapers? There’s a big depression. The European situation is terrible. The domestic situation is worse.”

Whereupon his father thought: “Well, my son’s been to college, he reads the newspapers and he listens to the radio and he ought to know.”

So the father cut down on his meat and bun orders, took down his sign and no longer bothered to stand out on the highway to sell his hot dogs.

And his hot dog sales fell almost overnight.

“You’re right, son,” the father said to his boy. “We certainly are in the middle of a great depression!”

Enough said?

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