Defender Industries reports record sales

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Defender Industries rewarded its employees this week for a record-breaking year in 2010, the company said.

The family-owned marine outfitter and catalog retailer in Waterford, Conn., said it saw sales grow 16.1 percent last year, its ninth consecutive year of growth and the seventh year in a row with record sales.

Defender Industries is privately owned and does not release sales figures.

"Customer satisfaction is fundamental to our continued success and we want each individual on the Defender team to have a financial stake in the success they achieve," executive director Al Knupp said in a statement.

"Our profit-share program is unique in that it is also designed to provide a significant additional reward to our staff for their years of service to Defender, which can double the amount an employee gets," he added. "On average, each employee is receiving nearly an extra week's pay."

Knupp said this is the fifth consecutive year that the company has shared its profits with the staff. He said the amount paid out is the largest to date.

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