ABYC electrical seminar set for Rhode Island - Trade Only Today

ABYC electrical seminar set for Rhode Island

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The American Boat and Yacht Council and the New England section of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers are holding a seminar Nov. 15 in Warwick, R.I., to discuss AC ground faults, troubleshooting dock wiring and how to mitigate risks.

ABYC educational programming director Ed Sherman will demonstrate the tools used to determine the integrity of both dock and on-board AC wiring and how to determine whether AC ground faults exist, how to isolate the source and common on-board sources of the potentially lethal leakage current.

The presentation will look at ABYC standards that are applicable to the mitigation of risk associated with AC ground faults and discuss the on-board design elements that need to be applied. Additionally, National Fire Protection Association and National Electric Code requirements for marina dock wiring inspections and ground fault protection on marina docks will be discussed.

Sherman has helped develop the marine industry’s certifications for marine surveyors, service technicians and boatbuilders. His training and certification programs are used by the Navy and the U.S. and Canadian Coast Guard, as well as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Transport Canada to ensure that their small boat fleets are built and maintained to ABYC standards.

The ABYC has hosted two webinars regarding grounding systems after two electrocution accidents last summer resulted in the deaths of four children. Tickets to the seminar can only be bought online.

Click here for information.

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