ABYC and NMEA join on conference training sessions - Trade Only Today

ABYC and NMEA join on conference training sessions

The National Marine Electronics Association and the American Boat and Yacht Council will offer a new combined training event.
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The National Marine Electronics Association and the American Boat and Yacht Council will offer a new combined training event at the NMEA’s Sept. 19-22 International Marine Electronics Conference & Expo in Florida.

The four-day event will focus two of the days on ABYC marine electrical standards and training, and two days on NMEA marine electronics standards and training.

The event is designed as a one-stop shop for boatbuilders, installers, technicians, marine mechanics and surveyors to get trained on ABYC and NMEA standards.

The event will take place at the Naples Grande Beach Resort in Naples, Fla., and will cost $1,195 for members and $1,695 for nonmembers. (Paid membership with ABYC or NMEA is required for member pricing.)

The course includes three certifications — ABYC Electrical, NMEA Marine Electronics Installer and NMEA 2000 Network.

Day one — ABYC Marine Electrical Certification training

Day two — ABYC Marine Electrical review and exam

Day three — NMEA Marine Electronics Installer training and testing

Day four — NMEA 2000 Network Installer training and testing.

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