AIM Marine Group throws support behind Bahamian relief efforts

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After much due diligence, the AIM Marine Group said that it plans to support the Go Fund Me campaign of Hope 4 Hopetown as part of its support for the Bahamas relief effort.

“Navigating the many organizations collecting money for the Bahamas relief effort can be daunting and confusing,” said an AIM Marine Group statement.

“The AIM Marine Group has been watching the destruction in the Bahamas from Hurricane Dorian with heavy hearts,” added Gary De Sanctis, president of the AIM Marine Group in the statement. “Seeing the place where so many of us have made memories with our families and friends suffer so much has spurred us into action.”

De Sanctis said the “first impulse of many of our staff was to organize supplies, get on a boat and head over there to help.” Given the hazards to navigation and lack of landing areas, he added, “we realized the islands would be better served if we helped raise money for the relief efforts.”

The group has had discussions with the Coast Guard, humanitarian groups and relief organizations about which charities to focus on. The Hope 4 Hope Town campaign has raised about $365,000 of its $1 million goal.

Patrick Davis, who organized the Hope 4 Hope Town go fund me campaign, said in a recent blog post that the relief efforts have begun across the Abacos.

“Contrary to what the name implies, proceeds from this organization will reach not just Hope Town but throughout the Abaco Islands,” said De Sanctis. “We hope you will join us in standing with The Bahamas and supporting the recovery effort. The Bahamas have given so much to the boating community, now is the time to give back to them.”

Patrick Davis, who organized the Hope 4 Hope Town campaign, said in a recent blog post that the relief efforts are ongoing, with support from the Go Fund Me campaign.

The AIM Marine Group also identified two other charities that it intends to support, Bahamas Red Cross and Third Wave Volunteers

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