Application deadline nears for RIMTA summer internship program - Trade Only Today

Application deadline nears for RIMTA summer internship program

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There is still room in the Rhode Island Marine Trades Association’s six-week work-and-learn program, a paid internship in which participants learn about marketing careers in the recreational boating industry and make valuable professional connections.

Rhode Islanders ages 17 to 24 who are interested in marketing jobs in the industry still have time to apply for the summer program, which runs from July 6 through Aug. 13.

The program is a paid internship that requires a 20-hour-a-week commitment. Participants will spend the summer around the waterfront, learning from leaders in the industry about marketing, event planning, public relations and communications.

The application deadline is Tuesday. More information can be found under the programs tab on the RIMTA website.

RIMTA also recently announced the expansion of its Marine Trades and Composites Pre-Apprenticeship Training Program, a free training program for Rhode Islanders who are interested in gaining the entry-level skills to do hands-on work in the industry.

The April graduation class had a 100 percent job placement rate at graduation.

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