Center for Coastal Conservation has a new name

The Center for Coastal Conservation said it changed its name to the Center for Sportfishing Policy.
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The Center for Coastal Conservation said it changed its name to the Center for Sportfishing Policy.

The saltwater recreational angler advocacy group Center for Coastal Conservation said it changed its name to the Center for Sportfishing Policy.

The group said the new name more accurately reflects its purpose, which is to organize, focus and engage recreational fishing stakeholders to shape federal marine fisheries management policies.

“Under the new name, the Center for Sportfishing Policy will continue to advocate for sound fisheries policy and communicate with Congress on behalf of the saltwater recreational fishing and boating community,” Center for Sportfishing Policy president Jeff Angers said in a statement.

“Our new name gets to the heart of our purpose at the center, which is to help drive legislation that serves to conserve America’s coastal fisheries while allowing fair and equitable access to America’s marine resources for recreational anglers and boaters.”

The center also launched a new website — — which illustrates the organization’s focus and purpose and includes key details of its “Let America Fish” campaign.

“Recreational fishing and boating are two of America’s oldest and most beloved pastimes. They are family-friendly activities that connect people to nature and help them to develop an abiding respect for our natural resources,” Angers said.

“We hope that our new website will help lawmakers and the general public gain a deeper understanding of how current federal fisheries law is disenfranchising America’s recreational anglers to the detriment of resource conservation and the country’s economy. Revising federal law and agency guidance will ensure fair and reasonable access to America’s marine fisheries, and improve fisheries management to guide the future of recreational fishing and boating.”

The advocacy organization said that, as a group, marine recreational anglers provide a greater economic impact than the domestic commercial fishing industry.

America’s 11 million recreational saltwater anglers make a combined economic contribution of $70 billion annually, spend $26.5 billion each year and create 455,000 American jobs, the group said.


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