Changing Places - Trade Only Today

Changing Places

Author:
Publish date:

Nicole Vasilaros joins the National Marine Manufacturers Association's Washington, D.C., office as state government affairs manager, where she will be responsible for government relations related to the Personal Watercraft Industries Association, an NMMA affiliate group.

She joins NMMA from the office of U.S. Rep. Suzanne Kosmas, D-Fla., where she managed health care, education, labor, immigration and judiciary issues. Vasilaros also gained legislative experience from work in the office of U.S. Rep. Robert Wexler, D-Fla., and The Cochran Firm.

She is a graduate of Emory University and the University of Florida's Levin College of Law.

* * *

Tigé Boats named Doug Romberg vice president of engineering and quality.

Romberg has nearly 20 years of experience implementing new product technology and managing quality assurance programs at some of the largest marine companies in the industry, most recently Brunswick and Yamaha.

He received an M.B.A. from the University of Tennessee and a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

"I had the privilege of working with Doug early in our careers," company president Rick Correll said in a statement. "His knowledge, dedication and team-building skills will be very instrumental in continuing our push to greater customer satisfaction and product innovation.

* * *

Dragonfly Boatworks, of Vero Beach, Fla., named Peter Starratt its lamination supervisor.

"A Fort Pierce (Fla.) native, Pete comes to us with an extensive history in the boat business," company owner Mark Castlow said in a statement. "He can do anything - rig, repair, create, glass, shape, tool ... you name it."

Starratt previously worked at Taylor Creek Marina in St. Lucie County. More recently, he spent 21 years at the Vero Beach Marine Center.

Related

Canada’s tariff time bomb?

The Canadian government is under pressure this week to agree to a revised NAFTA. If it doesn’t happen, the tariffs on U.S. boats will stay in place and continue to damage the boating industry on both sides of the border.