Correct Craft workers provide hurricane relief

Author:
Publish date:

Employees of Nautique and parent company Correct Craft brought hurricane relief to a local community in Florida’s panhandle last weekend, helping clean up debris and repairing homes impacted by Hurricane Michael.

Michael, which struck Mexico Beach, Fla., on Oct. 10, was the first Category 4 storm to make landfall in Florida’s panhandle, and the third-most intense Atlantic hurricane to make landfall in the contiguous United States.

Despite being one of the worst storms to strike the United States, donations for recovery and cleanup have lagged far behind recent storms such as Florence, Irma and Harvey, according to an analysis of the top three charities by the Tampa Bay Times and Miami Herald.

Correct Craft and Nautique employees helped clean up debris and made repairs to homes in the community impacted. The team also donated cleaning supplies, clothing and medicine to impacted locals.

Bill Yeargin, Correct Craft’s president and CEO, joined the team on this service trip.

“With all the news about the devastating damage from Hurricane Michael, our team was eager to help those impacted get back on their feet,” Yeargin said in a statement. “While the news media has moved on to other stories, there are still many people suffering in our home state.”

The Tampa Bay Times and Miami Herald reported that the Salvation Army has received $2.8 million for its Hurricane Michael response. It received a combined $125 million after Harvey, Irma and Maria in 2017.

United Way Worldwide received just under $750,000 for Hurricane Michael recovery. That’s more than $10 million less than it received for its combined fund for Hurricanes Irma and Maria. That’s about $100,000 less than it received for the 2017 Mexican earthquake.

“In terms of the national response … this was the strongest storm to hit the U.S. since Andrew, and it has not been commensurate with that,” Lance Rettig, who leads the Bay County Long Term Disaster Recovery Organization, told the Miami Herald.

It will take hundreds of millions of dollars for a low-income community to bounce back from such a disaster, Rettig said.

Correct Craft has a long history of helping out in areas that have been struck by misfortune or overlooked in recovery efforts. 

Related

Snapper Quotas in Flux Again

NOAA Fisheries wants Gulf Coast states to revert back to the data collection model that the recreational fishing community has widely criticized.