Skip to main content

Demand increases for Colorado River water

The decades of compacts, laws, contracts and regulatory guidelines that are supposed to manage bordering states’ use of the Colorado River have come to be known collectively as the "Law of the River."

But it could soon bump up against the laws of physics, according to a report from the Cronkite News Service.

Ninety years after the first agreements were drawn up and more than 50 years after the Supreme Court set water-use levels for Arizona and its neighbors, demand for Colorado River water continues to grow. But the amount of water flowing in the river and the allotments of it to different users remains the same.

In 2011, Arizona used more than 99 percent of its allotted 2.8 million acre-feet of water for homes, crops, recreation and businesses across the state.

Add to that demand a proposal in Washington to allocate 20,000 acre-feet of river water to the Navajo and Hopi tribes, and the state is bumping right up against the limit, if not going slightly over it.

Trying to squeeze every last sanctioned drop from the exhausted river has an effect up and down the Colorado, from the reservations upstream to the croplands 1,000 miles downstream.

“If it wasn’t for water in this area, [farmers] wouldn’t be farming here,” said Ed Carpenter, manager at the Yuma County Water Users’ Association. “So here, water is everything.”

By the time it reaches Carpenter’s farmers, the water in the Colorado River has already made a long journey from its sources in the snow-capped Rocky Mountains.

If left untouched by man, the river would deliver about 16.5 million-acre feet of water to the Gulf of California annually. But today only a fraction of that amount reaches the gulf.

Click here for the full report.

Related

1_.MARTIN_FLORY

PR Firm Celebrates 60th Anniversary

Martin Flory Group has served the RV and marine industry segments since 1962.

Screen Shot 2022-09-26 at 9.29.49 AM

Mack Boring Turns 100

The New Jersey-based engine and components supplier, started in 1922 by Edward “Mack” McGovern, today is still a family-run business.

2_IBEX

IBEX Canceled

Tropical Storm Ian is expected to strengthen into a hurricane and impact Florida’s west coast sometime Wednesday.

3_Manitou-MY23-VW06-Rotax-Engine-Cutaway-Feature

Clearing the Deck

Bombardier Recreational Products unveiled the Rotax outboard with Stealth Technology in August

AdobeStock_306648964

Shoring Up Your Defenses

Marine businesses are just as open to cyberattacks as all kinds of other businesses in nearly every industry

1_Silent_Jet_Render_Main0214

Hinckley Unveils SilentJet

Hinckley Yachts teamed up with Wisconsin-based transmission-maker Twin Disc to create a hybrid electric system called SilentJet that can switch automatically from diesel to electric power, depending on how much throttle you use.

IMG_8361

Finding the Next Buyers

Discover Boating commissioned a research study to fine-tune targeting efforts in marketing.