Skip to main content

Effort to help Filipino fishermen is under way

A project is under way to help residents of the Philippines who lost fishing boats get their livelihood back.

On Nov. 8, Typhoon Haiyan claimed not only the lives of thousands and millions in properties in the Philippines, but the livelihood of the survivors as well when 5,000 fishing boats were destroyed. One of the worst affected areas is Bantayan Island, where fishing has a huge impact on the local economy and to the Philippines overall.

Although some of the early days were focused on helping residents meet basic needs — a struggle that still continues — a coalition of groups is trying to help residents regain the main source of their livelihood through the Bantayan Back to Sea Project https://www.facebook.com/backtoseaproject

Bantayan is west of the northern end of Cebu and is considered to be Cebu’s fishing ground. Boatloads of fish are transported daily to Cebu City and Negros for consumption and further distribution to as far as Mindanao and Manila.

A group of Bantayan residents from Bantayan Island Nature Park and Resort initiated the Back To Sea Project to empower the fishermen in Bantayan to rebuild their lost livelihood through “bayanihan,” or “helping each other."

The Back to Sea Project aims to reconnect Bantayan fishermen with their livelihood.

Once a barangay is set up, meaning there is already an agreement between elected officials and officers of the fishermen group, the Back to Sea Project will fund them according to a budget based on the list of affected fishermen.

The first step will be to set up a boat repair and building station, complete with tools and hired boatbuilders.

The more skilled the boatbuilding and repair labor that volunteers, the more stations that can be set up. As the local Filipino community has extended its call for help, marine industry veteran Barbara Jean Walsh found herself thinking: “Maybe the U.S. marine industry could do something? Maybe, but only if they knew about it.”

The production of the boats will depend on the capacity of the station.

The pilot station is expected to produce five boats every five days. The Back to Sea Project is not into the commercial production of boats, so it declined requests to make boats for certain people.

If donors have beneficiaries in mind, they have to be members of a fishermen’s association because the foundation of the project is “sustainability” and “bayanihan.”

Related

1_WHALESACTION

NMMA: Proposed Speed Rule an ‘Existential Threat’ to Industry

The association is calling on every marine brand, employee and boat owner to file public comment by Oct. 31 over a sweeping regulation to protect North Atlantic right whales.

1_AXOPAR

Axopar and Nimbus Renew Agreement

The boatbuilders have entered an agreement whereby Nimbus Group will retain exclusive rights to sell Axopar boats on the Swedish market.

1_IAN

Hurricane Ian Leaves Devastation in Florida

The storm left a wide swath of destruction, heavily impacting marine interests from Tampa Bay to Marco Island.

Norm

Email Is Your Ticket to Holiday Sales

Developing an effective email campaign can bolster sales and help fill winter coffers at your dealership.

1_NMRA

NMRA Presents Annual Awards

Edson CEO Will Keene and ComMar Sales president Tim Conroy were recognized for their contributions to the marine industry.

1_ PULSE.PING.2

DEALERS: Are Interest Rates Impacting Demand?

This month’s Pulse Report survey asks dealers whether interest rate increases are causing a downturn in boat sales. Take the survey here.

1_EPROPULSION

EPropulsion, Mack Boring Partner with Crest

Pontoon builder Crest will use an ePropulsion Navy 3.0 Evo electric outboard motor and an E175 battery for its 2023 Current model.

1_BENETEAU

Beneteau Reports Significant H122 Growth

The company reported that its revenue grew 8.6 percent and income increased by 30 percent during the first half of 2022.