Garmin wins ruling in Navico patent lawsuit - Trade Only Today

Garmin wins ruling in Navico patent lawsuit

The judge concluded that Garmin’s DownVü scanning sonar technology does not infringe on any patented aspect of Navico’s downscan technology
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Garmin International, a subsidiary of Garmin Ltd., said today that an administrative law judge at the International Trade Commission issued an initial determination in an investigation that Navico Holdings AS brought against Garmin.

The judge concluded that Garmin’s DownVü scanning sonar technology does not infringe on any patented aspect of Navico’s downscan technology. The ruling is subject to review by the ITC.

“Garmin is very pleased with the ALJ’s initial determination that our DownVü products are not covered by any Navico patent,” Garmin vice president and general counsel Andrew Etkind said in a statement. “This ruling demonstrates the steadfast determination by Garmin to fight any and all baseless patent claims.”

“Our competitors have been investing their resources in baseless litigation, which does not benefit customers or the industry,” Garmin president and CEO Cliff Pemble said. “We believe that investing in research and development results in unique innovations, such as our DownVü sonar, that offer superior value to our customers. This legal victory validates our approach.”

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