Hurricane Matthew strengthens as it heads to U.S. - Trade Only Today

Hurricane Matthew strengthens as it heads to U.S.

Hurricane Matthew continued to strengthen this morning as it inched toward the United States.
Author:
Publish date:
The Weather Channel predicted that the storm surge from Hurricane Matthew will be as high as nine feet from Melbourne, Fla., to Savannah, Ga.

The Weather Channel predicted that the storm surge from Hurricane Matthew will be as high as nine feet from Melbourne, Fla., to Savannah, Ga.

Hurricane Matthew continued to strengthen this morning as it inched toward the United States, where more than a million people were evacuating South Atlantic coastal communities.

People were fleeing Florida, Georgia and South Carolina after Matthew, which had already swept through Haiti and brushed Cuba, began to pummel the Bahamas.

Tropical storm conditions were expected in Florida as early as this morning before the slow-moving Matthew takes a turn to the north-northwest and approaches the east coast of the state's peninsula by Friday, the National Hurricane Center said.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott pleaded with residents to follow evacuation orders, according to NBC News.

"Do not surf. Do not go on the beach. This will kill you," he said at a press conference today. "There is no reason not to leave."

Scott activated 2,500 members of the National Guard and warned Floridians that projected winds of 100 to 150 mph will destroy houses and "millions will lose power, possibly for a long period of time.”

The storm is expected to produce a life-threatening storm surge, damaging winds and flooding rainfall, according to The Weather Channel.

Matthew was expected to strike Florida’s peninsula and southeastern Georgia late today and Friday, and possibly linger into Saturday in northeastern Florida. The eastern Carolinas were expected to see effects from Matthew later Friday to Saturday, and possibly into Sunday.

If the peak surge coincides with high tide, water levels could reach the following levels, according to the National Hurricane Center:

  • Sebastian Inlet, Florida, to the Savannah River, Georgia: 6 to 9 feet above ground level
  • Deerfield Beach, Florida, to the Sebastian Inlet, Florida: 3 to 5 feet above ground level
  • Savannah River, Georgia, to South Santee River, South Carolina: 3 to 5 feet above ground level
  • Virginia Key, Florida, to Deerfield Beach, Florida: 1 to 2 feet above ground level

Hurricane-force winds — 74-plus mph — are likely along Florida's east coast, starting tonight, and potentially north of there in coastal parts of Georgia and the Carolinas Friday into Saturday.

The greatest chance of destructive hurricane-force winds is along Florida's east coast. Damaging winds are likely to occur no matter whether the center of Matthew makes landfall or stays just offshore. The strength of the winds will depend on how close the eyewall passes to the coast.

Matthew is forecast to be a major hurricane (Category 3 or stronger) when it moves near Florida's east coast, so extreme damage from winds of more than 100 mph is very possible.

The National Weather Service said in a local statement that widespread extensive to devastating wind effects will be felt along the coast.

A graphic from The National Weather Service depicts Matthew’s hurricane-force wind potential.

A graphic from The National Weather Service depicts Matthew’s hurricane-force wind potential.

The heaviest rainfall totals, possibly ranging from 5 to 12 inches, are likely to be confined to the immediate coast, from Florida to eastern North Carolina. There is a potential for even heavier rainfall if Matthew makes landfall.

Though it was once predicted to head for the Northeast, meteorologists now expect Matthew to veer away from the coastal Carolinas on Sunday.

Related

E-nnovation Lab to expand at 2018 Metstrade show

The growing demand for hybrid and electric engines is becoming more apparent within the leisure marine market, prompting Metstrade to introduce the E-nnovation Lab platform for electric propulsion technology.

Aluminum, tow boats lead moderate growth in May

Boat registrations were up 2.1 percent in May in the main powerboat categories, and rose 3.2 percent in all categories, according to preliminary data from Statistical Surveys Inc., a Michigan company that tracks new boat registrations.

Retaliatory tariffs on boats to EU start today

The 25 percent tariff the EU announced Wednesday on U.S.-built boats kicks in today, and a 10 percent tariff on boats sold to Canada will start July 1, prompting boatbuilders to worry they will lose sales to those countries.