IMI sets schedule for management courses - Trade Only Today

IMI sets schedule for management courses

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The International Marina Instituteis offering its Intermediate Marina Management course in six modules to make the training more convenient for those who can't attend the full four-day course.

The first module, “Marina Law,” will be delivered Oct. 13 at the California Association of Harbor Masters & Port Captains conference in Sacramento, Calif.

The IMM was broken down into six modules with the intent of partnering with other regional marine trade associations to bring convenient and cost-effective training opportunities to their memberships.

“In the current economic environment, trade associations are constantly seeking ways to add value and to provide their members with quality products at discounted prices. This will do just that,” IMI training coordinator Kayce Florio said in a statement. “We see this as a win-win for the industry and trade associations as a whole.”

Dennis Nixon, a marina law expert and one of the founders of IMI in 1986, will be delivering the marina law module of the IMM course at the conference in Sacramento.

E-mail imitraining@marinaassociation.org or call (401) 247–0314 for information.

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