Industry mourns Linda Klockner

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Linda Klockner

Linda Klockner

Linda Klockner, who spent much of her career as marketing communications director for Sail magazine, died May 30 at her Sherborn, Mass., home. She was 66.

At Sail, she worked with colleagues who shared her love of sailing as well as the collaborative process of publishing and promoting the magazine, according to her obituary.

Her nephew, Ronstan managing director Scot West, recalled how moved he and his aunt were when former fellow Sail magazine colleagues reached out to her during her illness. She often spoke highly of former longtime Sail publisher Don Macaulay and his impact on the Sail team during the 1970s, 80s and 90s.

“One of the nicest memories I shared with Linda during her final months was just reflecting on her time and the team at Sail magazine,” West told Trade Only Today. “She shared a bond with her coworkers that isn’t seen as often these days. Linda had so much pride in both Sail magazine and frankly the sailing industry in general.”

Above all her professional accomplishments, Klockner was dedicated to her daughter Leah and husband Jim.

As a trio, they had many sailing adventures in Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound on their annual trips to the Islands. Linda was part of a large extended family of Klockner relatives, all of whom frequently gathered for holidays, birthdays, and weddings. She was an aunt of many nephews and nieces as well as great-nephews and great-nieces, and her knack for finding just the right gifts for Christmas and birthdays was renown.

She is survived by her husband and daughter, as well as by her siblings and their spouses including Christina and Jock West of Portsmouth R.I. (Jock West sold ads for Cruising World and Sailing World). She is also survived by Joseph Klockner Jr. and Ginny Myers of Takoma Park, Md.,, Karen M. Klockner and Dr. Fred Alexander of Ridgewood, N.J., and David Klockner and Kristina Lynn Klockner of Marlboro, N.J. She has 15 nieces and nephews and 11 great-nieces and nephews. 

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