Industry mourns noted Midwestern ‘peddler’

Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0

Marine industry veteran Patrick H. Arnold died Aug. 26 after a brief illness. He was 77.

Born in Hamilton Ohio, Arnold graduated from Miami University in Miami, Ohio. A career “peddler,” he made his mark in the marine industry early on. As a salesman for BF Goodrich, Arnold sold vinyl to contract furniture manufacturers before seeing an opportunity in the marine market. In 1974 he became the driving force behind the Marine Specialties Group, a division of G&T Industries.

Under his direction, Marine Specialties Group became the largest soft surface supplier to the marine industry with several locations throughout the eastern United States. Arnold was known for his unapologetic love of being a “peddler,” the title he used on his business cards during his entire career.

Arnold made his mark in the marine industry on a business and personal level. He was an innovator in his thinking, having no fear of new and creative ideas, which followed through in his product designs and service level developments.

He served in the Army from 1956 until 1960, passing his combat boots down to subsequent generations.

Arnold was a visionary business man who often said, “Even a bad plan is better than no plan.” Many business associates remember fishing the Amazon with Arnold, who organized the trip. He made his home in Merritt Island, Fla., after living in Grand Rapids, Mich., for many years.

Click here for the full obituary.

Related

American Sailing Association reaches milestone

The American Sailing Association recently certified its half-millionth sailor. Since the association was founded in 1983, its affiliated schools and instructors have taught and certified more than 507,000 people to ASA’s 101 Keelboat Sailing standard.

First set of tariffs on aluminum sheet announced

The U.S. Commerce Department announced the countervailing tariff amounts on aluminum sheet from China, with varying amounts imposed on different Chinese suppliers that are scheduled to take effect within two to five business days.