Jan Boone, president of Bluewater Yacht Sales, dies

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Jan Boone

Jan Boone

Jan Boone, president of Bluewater Yacht Sales, died on May 29 after a prolonged battle with cancer.

“This devastating loss to her family, friends & co-workers has also jolted the close-knit boating industry at large,” said a Bluewater statement. “As condolences pour in from around the world, it is readily apparent how many people Jan moved with her commitment to excellence and genuine friendships.”

Boone graduated with a degree in business from UNC-Greensboro, and shortly after began working with Hatteras Yachts in High Point, North Carolina. She moved with the company to its New Bern facility in the late ’90s, working in marketing, customer service, personnel management and sales-related positions. She was eventually named vice president of sales.

In 2008, Randy Ramsey, chairman of Jarrett Bay Yacht Sales (JBYS), offered Boone the position of company president. Boone took the job, despite the industry being in the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. “Her calculated steps not only navigated the company through these difficult times, she positioned their operations to be revitalized with exponential sales figures as the economy rebounded,” said the statement.

In October 2012, Boone directed the merger between Jarrett Bay Yacht Sales and Bluewater Yacht Sales to form one of the largest new & brokerage yacht companies in the world. “Jan maintained Bluewater’s leading market position while overseeing the sale of new models from 10 world-class brands, guiding over 50 employees in ten East Coast sales locations, and facilitating the sale of thousands of listings valued at hundreds of millions of dollars,” said the statement.

“Jan Boone’s principles, dedication and achievements will endure through the generations of colleagues she mentored and inspired,” said the statement. “She is inimitable and will always be remembered for her strong will, work ethic and heart.”

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