Marine lenders conference opens Sunday in California

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The National Marine Lenders Association will hold its 38th annual Lenders Conference from Sunday through Tuesday.

The conference will be held at the Hyatt Indian Wells Resort and Spa in Indian Wells, Calif., and will focus on topics that include fraud and managing dealer risk.

On Sunday the NMLA’s board of directors will meet and registration for the conference will occur before a welcome reception.

On Monday, Brunswick Corp. CEO Mark Schwabero will address the group on marine trends and opportunities. Don Parkhurst, of SunTrust, and Carrie Schmidt, of Annapolis Yacht Documentation LLC, will provide legislative and American Vessel Documentation Association updates.

Adam Cooke, of McIntosh Schwartz, PL, and Christopher Anderson, of Robert Allen Law, will address conferees about the pros and cons of financing foreign-flagged vessels.

Bob Dunford Jr., of Trident Funding, and Matt Chalverus, with Bank of the Ozarks, will talk about how to evaluate collateral values and loan advance and give perspective on direct versus indirect lending. Afterward there will be a panel discussion on understanding and managing dealer risk.

The seminar lineup on Monday will wrap up with a special panel discussion titled “Hurricane Aftermath — What it Means to the Marine Industry,” which will be moderated by Peggy Bodenreider, sales manager at Sterling Acceptance Corp.

Tuesday’s highlights include a session titled “Fighting Fraud — Safeguarding Your Business” by Duane Bunn, of Ameris Bank.

There also will be a session on the U.S. economy titled “Bracing for Higher Interest Rates” by Eugenio Aleman, of Wells Fargo Securities.

The full conference agenda can be found here.

The NMLA will sponsor a reception for platinum, gold and silver sponsors on Saturday before the conference starts. Platinum sponsors include Manheim Specialty Auctions, Marathon Specialty Finance, SunTrust and Trident Funding Corp.

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