Marine Travelift debuts new boat hoist

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Marine Travelift says its 85 BFMII boat hoist is designed to align with market trends and the growing size of vessels.

Marine Travelift says its 85 BFMII boat hoist is designed to align with market trends and the growing size of vessels.

Marine Travelift Inc. said it has introduced a new 85 BFMII boat hoist to its network of international and domestic distributors.

The Wisconsin-based company said the new-capacity machine is designed to align with market trends and the growing size of vessels in the expanding marketplace. As fishing and leisure vessels are built to larger and heavier specifications, there is a need for a boat hoist with higher capacity to lift them while maintaining current infrastructure, the company said.

Jason Johnson, the company’s North American sales director, said one of the design benefits of the new 85 BFMII is the tire width and wheel frame profile.

“It was designed with existing launching pier perimeters in mind,” Johnson said in a statement. “This unique design makes the 85 BFMII a turnkey solution for marinas to upgrade hoisting capacity without the expense of upgrading their current infrastructure.”

The company said the 85 BFMII was engineered from the mechanical reliability of existing Marine Travelift boat hoists, plus innovations and features. It has new industrial tires and a modified wheel frame, a new slew bearing system with easy access grease points and sealed housing.

“The Parker IQAN system is an impressive addition to the current BFMII design for added operator convenience,” Johnson said. “With IQAN, operators have intelligent diagnostics on engine performance and machine function through LCD displays on the redesigned cab and on the new radio remote.”

Another benefit is increased hydraulic sling adjustment speeds, which aid in operator efficiency, the company said.

“The hydraulic system has been optimized to achieve the fastest adjustment speeds in its class,” Johnson said. “This means operators can get slings in place faster, which will allow more efficient cradling of a floating vessel.”

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