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Maryland lawmaker involved in BUI crash

A Maryland lawmaker who told police he was drinking alcohol while piloting a speedboat that collided with a vessel full of children, injuring four of them, did not have a recommended boater safety certificate.

Delegate Donald H. Dwyer Jr., an Anne Arundel County Republican and an outspoken member of the state House Judiciary Committee, was not required to have completed a state safety course because Maryland boaters born before 1972 are exempt, according to the Washington Post.

On Friday, doctors were still monitoring the youngest of four children hospitalized after the Wednesday evening crash — a 5-year-old girl who authorities said suffered a fractured skull. She was thrown from the craft that collided with Dwyer’s boat in the Magothy River about 5 miles north of Route 50 in Anne Arundel County.

Three other children, all under 13, were treated and released for cuts, bruises and a broken arm. A family member said Dwyer could need surgery, but declined to elaborate.

Authorities on Friday identified a second adult who was on Dwyer’s 27-foot Baja, which the three-term delegate dubbed The Legislator.

The passenger was John E. Moran IV, a former police officer who narrowly lost an election for Anne Arundel County sheriff in 2006.

The accident on the Maryland river occurred during a season that also included the accidental sinking of a 34-foot Silverton powerboat on the Fourth of July on New York’s Oyster Bay in which three children were killed.

Dwyer appeared before reporters Thursday in a wheelchair and wearing a neck brace and said his blood-alcohol level had been 0.2, or more than twice the legal limit for operating a boat.

On Friday, Dwyer’s Republican colleagues in the House of Delegates issued a statement distancing themselves from his actions.

If Dwyer is found at fault, he could at most be charged with misdemeanors: negligence and operating a boat under the influence. Combined, the two charges carry maximum penalties of $1,500 and 13 months in prison.

Under Maryland law, only boating accidents that result in deaths can be prosecuted as felonies.

Click here for the full report.

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