Skip to main content

MRAA will run Minnesota trade group operations

The Marine Retailers Association of the Americas will assume the management of the North Central Marine Association.

The NCMA, based in Minneapolis, is a nearly 60-year-old marine trades association that serves Minnesota and businesses from neighboring states.

The award-winning trade association was managed for years by a local management firm, but when the recession hit the group narrowed its offerings to the services of a full-time lobbyist. Now the NCMA is officially back up and running at full capacity, thanks to a working relationship between the two associations.

“We are honored to play a role in the rejuvenation of the NCMA,” MRAA president and new NCMA director Matt Gruhn said in a statement. “As a member of the Minnesota marine industry for the better part of the last 16 years, I feel connected and personally vested in the success of this group and its members. With the common interests shared by MRAA and NCMA it is a natural progression for us to join forces.”

The MRAA will manage the NCMA’s administrative functions and bookkeeping responsibilities, in addition to taking responsibility for the NCMA’s marketing, legislative efforts and membership growth. The MRAA also will organize and produce all NCMA events, including the association’s annual meeting, golf outing, and annual awards and hall of fame banquet, among other things.

“This is a great opportunity for NCMA to get its feet back on the ground and begin its return to the prominent association that it once was,” Jerry Rockvam, chairman of the NCMA board and president of Rockvam Boatyards Inc., in Spring Park, Minn., said in a statement. “With Matt’s knowledge of our members and our local market, MRAA’s access to resources to manage our efforts and the revamping of our most critical member benefits we are poised to once again unite the marine community in Minnesota.”

Click here for the full release.

Related

MARINE-PRODUCTS

Marine Products Reports Record Q4

The builder of Chaparral and Robalo boats reported net sales were up 42% for the quarter and 28% for fiscal year 2022.

1_SHURHOLD

Shurhold Appoints COO

Forrest Ferrari has years of management, business development, IT and quality-assurance experience.

MOBILE-CATCH-CENTER

RBFF, Pure Fishing Partner for a First Catch Center

Pure Fishing will equip a mobile trailer with tackle and gear to bring fishing experiences to areas of South Carolina where participation is low.

Norm

An Oft-Overlooked Sales Opportunity

A recent report from the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation showed that women comprise 37% of all anglers. If you haven’t tapped this segment, you’re missing out.

1. 2023 new boat retail outlook

Too Many High-Priced Boats

To wrap up 2022, marine retailers reported lower demand, expressed more negative sentiment and voiced concerns about rising inventory. Boat prices and the economy remained top of mind for dealers in December.

Soundings Nov 2022

New-Boat Registrations Continue to Slide

As the gaudy sales figures from the pandemic continue to return to more realistic numbers, the main segments of the recreational boating industry saw new-model registrations of 4,421 in November, a 30.3% drop from 6,340 during the same time in 2021. .

1_thumbnail_Darren Vaux Headshet 2022

ICOMIA President Darren Vaux sees common pressures facing worldwide boating industry

Founded in 1966, the International Council of Marine Industry Associations is a global organization composed of national boating federations and other bodies involved in the recreational marine industry. ICOMIA works on such issues as breaking down trade barriers, improving boating safety and promoting recreational boating worldwide.

1_AdobeStock_175388620

Clearing the Waterways

In Florida, in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian, it was estimated that there were 6,000 derelict boats in southwest part of the state. In most cases, boat owners don’t know resources are available to remove them because until recently there weren’t many.

1_AdobeStock_40421038

A Window on the World

Inflation, supply-chain kinks and the continuing war in Ukraine continue to be serious concerns, but numerous companies with a global presence for exports are reporting optimism at the start of 2023.