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NMEA to offer sessions at METS

The National Marine Electronics Association will offer two educational sessions on NMEA 2000 during the Marine Equipment Trades Show in Amsterdam this November.

The first is ConnectFest, a live demonstration of the NMEA 2000 "open" industry networking standard. A number of manufacturers will be interacting and demonstrating the interoperability of different products talking the same language in a network environment. They will answer questions of hidden costs, ease of installation, simplicity, configurability and scalability.

The NMEA will also offer a boatbuilding workshop, "Getting Your Boat Ready for Marine Electronics." This seminar will consider standard practices from the NMEA Installation Standards used in the aftermarket and identify which practices boatbuilders can adopt. Examples will illustrate how common problems with production boats are fixed in the field, and what can be done to avoid the problems in the first place.

Click here to sign up for the sessions.

Click here for the full release.

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