NMMA participates in NAFTA negotiations

Author:
Publish date:

The sixth round of North American Free Trade Agreement negotiations took place in late January, and the National Marine Manufacturers Association is working with members of Congress to address the issues that it says would affect the recreational boating industry.

Key areas of focus for the NMMA include securing changes to how the rules of origin are calculated for boat and engine packages, and securing new chapters on regulatory coherence, as well as reduced technical barriers to trade, which could include recognition of NMMA Certification throughout North America.

In the most recent round of negotiations in Montreal at the end of January, negotiators didn't make major breakthroughs on some of the most difficult issues, the NMMA said.

There were, however, creative attempts to breach major hurdles, the NMMA said.

Last week, 36 Senate Republicans called on President Trump to preserve NAFTA in a letter spearheaded by Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado.

The letter, which included Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas, said that Trump has the “opportunity to unleash the American economy like no president has done before.”

NAFTA has driven U.S. trade with Canada and Mexico to approximately $1.3 trillion annually, Gardner wrote. That has benefited several industries in the United States, as well as American consumers, the senators wrote in the letter Jan. 30.

“Canadians and Mexicans buy nearly $500 billion worth of U.S. manufactured goods each year, translating to $37,000 in export revenue for every American factory worker,” they wrote.

“NAFTA supports 14 million jobs, representing thousands of jobs in each of the 50 states,” the senators wrote.

“The next step to advance the economy requires that we keep NAFTA in place, but modernize it to better reflect our 21st century economy,” Gardner said.

Negotiators closed the anti-corruption chapter during round six, the NMMA said. The chapter was not previously included in NAFTA and will include a dispute resolution mechanism to ensure the chapter is enforceable.

Democratic lawmakers were in Montreal to increase pressure to create stronger labor measures. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said he agreed the new NAFTA should have stronger labor protections than what was agreed to in the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Other chapters discussed included rules of origin, dispute settlement, and services trade.

Related

ABYC Foundation Seeks Nominations for Educator Award

The award recognizes “an outstanding instructor who is shaping future marine service technicians.”

P.R. Firm Rushton Gregory Signs ePropulsion

The Chinese manufacturer of electric propulsion products introduced a standardized lineup earlier this year.

Dometic Updates Pro-Trim System

The new design allows boaters to trim the outboard and adjust the jack plate without removing their hands from the wheel.

Brunswick Partners with Carnegie Robotics

Through the alliance, Brunswick aims to enhance its autonomous technology offerings.

Nicole Vasilaros to Depart NMMA

The group credits the senior vice president of government and legal affairs for “countless contributions to the protection and expansion of the recreational boating industry.”

Site Unseen

A website is often the first interaction a customer will have with a dealership, but it must provide more than an online brochure or they will click elsewhere.

C.G. Amends Documentation Rules

Federally documenting a boat now must be done every five years, rather than annually.

The 2021 Top 10 Most Innovative Marine Companies Awards

The marine industry consistently honors products and people. The industry, however, has not recognized forward-thinking companies that are moving the industry in new directions. Soundings Trade Only’s mission is to reflect, inform and inspire.