NMMA seeks boatbuilders for Rio show - Trade Only Today

NMMA seeks boatbuilders for Rio show

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The National Marine Manufacturers Association is asking boatbuilders to join the first USA Pavilion at the Rio de Janeiro International Boat Show, which takes place April 25 through May 2.

“Brazil is an important trading partner for the U.S. recreational boating industry,” the NMMA said in a statement. “In 2011 nearly $80 million in boats and engines were exported to Brazil. That figure is projected to be even higher in 2012. Despite an increase in import duties, exports to Brazil rose 15 percent during the first half of the year, maintaining Brazil's position as one of the top five export markets for U.S. recreational boats and associated products — larger than Germany, Italy and Spain.”

To help U.S. businesses find new customers in the growing marine market, the NMMA is taking the lead on hosting the first USA Pavilion at the Rio de Janeiro show.

Understanding the opportunities and challenges businesses face in importing to Brazil is critical to success, the NMMA said, adding that it is offering businesses a cost-effective way to engage in in-country market research and establish their presence in the key marketplace.

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