Reviving the nation’s marine highway system

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Some areas of the country are seeing a renewed interest in transporting freight via water.

Advocates point to several advantages of reviving the nation’s marine highway system, such as reducing the amount of fuel needed to transport cargo and freeing up congestion on the nation’s highways and rail systems, according to a recent report from the Associated Press.

However, there are several obstacles to expanding the marine highway system, according to the article, including the cost of upgrading infrastructure, scarcity of U.S. ships for short-sea routes, and a harbor maintenance tax for international cargo containers shipped domestically by water.

The Associated Press notes that the economic stimulus package passed by Congress included $27 billion for road-building projects and $12 billion for rail and other infrastructure improvements but nothing for short-sea shipping.

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