Sailing conference opens today

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The 2010 Sailing Industry Conference hosted by Sail America starts today at St. John's College in Annapolis, Md.

The gathering, which runs through Wednesday, will include 140 industry executives, managers and media meeting to discuss adjustments to the economy after the recession.

The goal of the conference, themed "Adjusting to the New Economy," is to provide attendees with a new perspective on the sailing marketplace, discuss new e-marketing tools, improve personal communication skills, and present sales ideas and tactics that have immediate and positive impact on business.

Guest speakers include US Sailing president Gary Jobson; Dean Brenner; chairman of the U.S. Olympic sailing program and president of The Latimer Group; Vince Morvillo, a motivational speaker and accomplished sailor; and Don Cooper, an expert in innovative selling.

"The solid attendance reflects the positive outlook on the economy by our industry," said committee chair George Day, publisher of Bluewater Sailing magazine.

"We signed 35 sponsors, which is more than at our 2008 conference and more than we expected," said Sail America executive director Jonathan Banks. "It is a sign that the core of the industry believes this conference is valuable and important."

- Dieter Loibner

Click here for the full conference program and agenda.

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