SeaStar Solutions acquires Illinois company - Trade Only Today

SeaStar Solutions acquires Illinois company

SeaStar Solutions acquired BluSkies International LLC, a St. Charles, Ill., manufacturer of marine diurnal systems and portable fuel tanks.
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SeaStar Solutions acquired BluSkies International LLC, a St. Charles, Ill., manufacturer of marine diurnal systems and portable fuel tanks.

SeaStar makes and supplies marine steering and control systems, engine parts, fuel tanks and related products.

“We are very excited about this acquisition, which is complimentary to Inca, our fuel tank business that we acquired two years ago,” SeaStar president and CEO Yvan Cote said in a statement.

“Fuel systems are an integral part of powerboats, and SeaStar is committed more than ever to bringing the same level of product performance and service that our customers always expect from us. BluSkies will remain in St. Charles and will continue to serve customers with the same commitment that they expect out of BluSkies and SeaStar Solutions. As members of the SeaStar family, BluSkies can now leverage all the resources that SeaStar has available to it.”

BluSkies will continue its normal operations, including the use of BluSkies International and other brand names.

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