SecureCore Pencil Anodes

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Sacrificial anodes help protect engines and heat exchangers from corrosion, but loose pieces of a worn anode can cause irreparable damage. Performance Metals’ new SecureCore Pencil Anodes are extruded with a heavy-duty, central steel core that secures the anode material until consumed, the company says.

Traditional pencil anodes are die-cast and screwed into brass plugs. As older anodes corrode, they usually “neck,” causing the end to fall off into the water system. Performance Metals says the SecureCore design prevents these anode chunks from breaking free, avoiding blockages and extending the service life of the anode.

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A stainless-steel plug ensures it stays in place. Unlike conventional zinc anodes, SecureCore Pencil Anodes are made from an aluminum alloy that is more active, lasts longer and is suitable for all types of water, according to the company. (Zinc becomes inactive in fresh water.) Using aluminum anodes in place of zinc also helps decrease pollution, the company says. SecureCore Pencil Anodes are now available with the patented Intelligent Anode sensing system. An internal probe detects when the anode has corroded to the point where it needs to be replaced. An external monitoring box will trigger an alarm with both an audible and visual signal.

A three-anode box can easily handle two engine heat exchangers and a generator. Other versions are also offered. SecureCore Pencil Anodes from Performance Metals come in a variety of sizes, lengths and options, and have suggested retail prices from $2.90 to $35. The Intelligent Anodes range from $8.68 to $44 and the monitoring box costs $63.57. Contact: Performance Metals, (877) 612-5213. www.performancemetals.com

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