Survey shows boaters are active, thrifty

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The Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation recently revealed new research that will help the boating industry better understand consumer attitudes toward boat purchases.

RBFF's Quantitative Study of Consumer Attitudes shows the boating lifestyle is robust, but buying habits have shifted.

"People are going to continue to buy boats, but more cautiously, without applying for as much financing," RBFF president and CEO Frank Peterson said in a statement. "We hope our boating stakeholders will use this research to help develop their marketing strategies for the coming year."

Among the findings:

  • Despite the economic downturn, nearly half of all consumers say they are still in the market for a boat in the next three years.
  • Consumers as a whole are not moving away from boating, but are more likely to try to find ways to make boating less costly. For example, they plan to do more repairs themselves or spend less on accessories for their boat.
  • Three in 10 consumers are considering purchasing a used boat.
  • The main reason that current boat owners are not in the market for a boat (new or used) is that 66 percent are satisfied with their current boat.

RBFF and BrandSpark International did the study in June. It provides detailed information about 1,885 boat owners and 977 non-boat owners ages 18 to 69.

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