Trademark renewed for NMEA 2000 - Trade Only Today

Trademark renewed for NMEA 2000

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The National Marine Electronics Association was granted a trademark renewal for NMEA 2000, the standard that facilitates the networking of marine electronics on recreational and commercial vessels.

A certificate issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office says the trademark covers software, instructional materials and the development of standards for promoting the interests of the marine electronics industry, as well as accreditation services, including developing and administering standards for certifying professionals in the field.

“When a company certifies a product, at that point they are allowed to use the NMEA 2000 logo, which identifies that the product has been validated and has met stringent requirements for NMEA 2000 certification,” NMEA technical director Steve Spitzer said in a statement. “The NMEA 2000 logo assures the boater that the product he or she is purchasing will reliably perform all the functions that are made possible by the NMEA 2000 standard.”

The NMEA 2000 Network was developed by the association, with participation from companies inside and outside the marine industry, and with the aid of the Coast Guard Research and Development Center.

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