VIDEO: Footage shows ex-NFL player after swim to survival

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Officials closed an investigation into the boating accident that forced former Miami Dolphins player Robert Konrad to swim about 16 hours to shore.

An incident report released by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission details the account Konrad gave law enforcement after he reached shore early on Jan. 8, including an estimate that his boat's damage would be $70,000.

The Bahamian government notified the U.S. Coast Guard that it found Konrad's vessel in the Bahamas near Dead Man's Reef on Jan. 9, ABC News said, citing the incident report.

Konrad, 38, who played for the Miami Dolphins from 1999 to 2004, told emergency responders that he'd fallen off his boat about 1 p.m. on Jan. 7 as it continued on autopilot toward the Bahamas.

Konrad told authorities that he was taking his vessel from Boca Raton, Fla., to Riviera Beach for "routine maintenance," according to the report.

"Konrad decided he would recreational-fish as he cruised to Riviera Beach," the report said.

A police video shows Konrad as he sat huddled in a police car in Palm Beach, Fla., shivering under a blanket with the heat cranked all the way up in the early hours of Jan. 8.

Authorities met with Konrad and his attorney, William Rafferty, on Jan. 14 at Good Samaritan Hospital to record a witness statement. They met again on Jan. 29 at Mariner Marine in Riviera Beach to photograph the damage to the boat. A staff member at the business estimated the damage at $70,000. The law enforcement report lists damage to his boat that includes damage to windows, gearcases on both motors and the bottom gelcoat and fiberglass.

Konrad later recounted his ordeal for the media, saying he "prayed to God" after falling from his 38-foot boat as he was trying to reel in a fish just as a large wave hit.

"I shouldn't be here," Konrad told reporters at the time.

He described the frustration of seeing Coast Guard helicopters that didn't spot him. He faced darkness, 10-foot waves and 25-mile-an-hour winds while his boat moved away on autopilot. Despite receiving stings from jellyfish and seeing a shark circle him, Konrad kept swimming.

Once he reached shore, he said it was "bittersweet" because he couldn't walk.

"I had hypothermia and my body was shaking uncontrollably. I didn't realize it was five in the morning," he said.

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