Willard Marine debuts RIB at Australian show - Trade Only Today

Willard Marine debuts RIB at Australian show

Willard Marine unveiled its new Sea Force 777 RIB this week.
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Willard Marine said its new 25-foot rigid-hull inflatable boat is designed with a deep-vee hull for maximum stability.

Willard Marine said its new 25-foot rigid-hull inflatable boat is designed with a deep-vee hull for maximum stability.

Willard Marine unveiled its new Sea Force 777 RIB this week at the Pacific International Maritime Exposition in Sydney, Australia.

The California-based builder said the military-grade fiberglass rigid-hull inflatable boat is 25 feet long, 9 feet wide and designed with a deep-vee hull for maximum stability in the roughest sea conditions.

The Steyr SE306J38 diesel engine with ZF-63 marine gear powering a Hamilton Jet drive HJ-274 provides 300 hp for a nine-member crew and can achieve 32 knots, the company said. Nine Ullman Dynamics shock-mitigating seats are installed for crew comfort and safety.

Willard said the 40-ounce polyurethane Wing inflatable collar is UV-coated and includes a seven-panel bow cover and rub strakes to reduce the risk of boat damage from boarding and stability during weight shifts.

Boats such as the 777 are necessary abroad to support a variety of bluewater missions, including rescue, patrol and visit, board, search and seizure. Built to ABYC standards, the 777 also can be built in aluminum and can accommodate a variety of seating configurations, law enforcement equipment, electrical packages, weather protection and navigation devices, the company said.

“Willard Marine has built hundreds of mission-proven boats for American and international militaries around the world, and the new Sea Force 777 is a larger version of our military-grade RHIBs that government agencies can depend upon the same way the U.S. Navy has for 25 years,” Willard Marine president and CEO Ulrich Gottschling said in a statement.

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