Lyman-Morse plans 65-foot sailing yacht

Construction is underway at Lyman-Morse Boatbuilding in Thomaston, Maine, on a 65-foot sailing yacht designed by Stephens Waring Yacht Design.
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This is a rendering of a 65-foot sailing yacht that Lyman-Morse is building in Maine.

This is a rendering of a 65-foot sailing yacht that Lyman-Morse is building in Maine.

Construction is underway at Lyman-Morse Boatbuilding in Thomaston, Maine, on a 65-foot sailing yacht designed by Stephens Waring Yacht Design.

Company president Drew Lyman and his team spent the spring and early summer months working closely with Belfast, Maine-based Stephens Waring and the owners, fine-tuning the design and construction process.

Lyman said the company built a full-scale mockup of the boat in March and an alternative mockup of the master stateroom and guest cabin. This setup enabled the owner, Lyman-Morse team and designers to walk through a couple of layouts to fine-tune the cockpit and interior layout according to the owner’s wishes.

“The owner came to us for our expertise in systems engineering and installation, our attention to detail and responsiveness to owners’ requests,” Lyman said in a statement. “In addition, our strength also lies in quality and cost management, both of which are crucial in a project this complex.”

Lyman said the mission of the modern classic sloop is first and foremost on easy day sailing, and having fun with friends and
family. The roomy cockpit flows into the raised saloon, which features large drop windows in the aft bulkhead for easy socializing and communications between exterior and interior spaces.

Accommodations provide for six, although Lyman said overnights and cruising are not top priorities for the owners. However, purposeful crew accommodations for delivery up and down the Eastern Seaboard were specified. And the owners’ cabin forward has all the creature comforts commensurate with a yacht of this caliber.

The talent of every Lyman-Morse department will be tapped. The builder said precision on every front is required in such a highly engineered boat.

The hull is built of composite cold-molded wood laminates over laminated Douglas fir frames and sheathed in fiberglass for abrasion protection. The deck is engineered of foam-cored plywood skins and teak planking on the exterior. Deep bulwarks make a graceful deck and add offshore security.

Lyman said the interior partitions and bulkhead are of marine-grade plywood, with high-quality wood veneer and solid wood cabinetry; all interior components are acoustically isolated from the hull structure and machinery.

Anna will be certified to ABS/ISO construction standards.

Lyman said the cold-molded hull construction is transparent in that the hull and structure is left exposed on the interior, rather than being covered up with ceiling and hull panels.

Douglas fir deck beams, traditional raised and V-groove paneling, bright varnish and white painted surfaces will make the interior light and airy, the builder said.

LM Fabrication will manufacture the custom-designed deck hardware, including the rail systems, butterfly hatch hardware, amidships boarding step and structural components.

Launch is expected in the fall of 2017.

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