Missouri orders Donzi center consoles for lake patrols - Trade Only Today

Missouri orders Donzi center consoles for lake patrols

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AMH Government Services, a sister company of Donzi, Baja, Fountain and Pro-Line in the Baja Marine group, has a contract to build four boats for the Missouri State Highway Patrol’s marine operations division.

The agency’s vessel of choice is a Donzi 290 Center Console performance boat and four more soon will be added to its fleet of a dozen.

The boats will be used to patrol the Lake of the Ozarks, a sprawling body of water with more than 1,150 miles of shoreline and heavy pleasure boat traffic.

AMH Government Services offers an extensive range of durable, mission-specific fiberglass composite boats customized to meet the needs of government agencies and commercial entities. AMH Government Services has a Government Services Administration rating, which is required to build and sell boats to federal and state agencies.

“The Missouri State Highway Patrol is a longstanding Donzi customer,” Baja Marine CEO Johnny Walker said in a statement. “Currently, we have an order to build four 290 CCs for them. Two already have shipped and the other two should be completed in the next three weeks.”

All AMH Government Services boats are built at the Baja Marine factory in Washington, N.C., and include the Donzi, Fountain and Pro-Line brands. The Donzi 290 and 320 Center Consoles, the Fountain 38 Center Console and 38 Pilot House and Pro-Line boats between 20 and 25 feet are among the leading models built by AMHGS for commercial and government buyers.

“Baja Marine does about 15 percent government/commercial business on average,” Walker said.

The Donzi 290 CC features Donzi’s Z-Tech ventilated, stepped, advanced-performance hull. Maximum power is twin outboard engines with a total of 550 horsepower.

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