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Nautique employees build homes on Indian reservation

A group of 24 Nautique employees recently traveled to Arizona to build homes for needy families on the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation.

Nautique employees installed doors, beams, windows and roofing for two homes 90 miles east of Phoenix. The company worked with the non-profit Amor Ministries to bring assistance to the reservation, which has an unemployment rate significantly higher than the national average.

This is the fifth service trip Nautique employees have taken outside central Florida in the last four years.

“Every service trip we take is incredible, and this year was no different,” Nautique president and CEO Bill Yeargin said in a statement. “The kindness, dedication and hard work our Nautique employees give to benefit those less fortunate and make the world a better place is truly amazing and clearly demonstrates the depth of their caring.”

Click here to read Yeargin’s blog for details of the trip.

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