Taco Marine holding raffle for project boat

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The boat being raffled is a 1989 Pursuit 2650 powerboat that was remodeled to 2017 standards.

The boat being raffled is a 1989 Pursuit 2650 powerboat that was remodeled to 2017 standards.

Taco Marine is holding a Project Boat Raffle Fundraiser for the I’M LOGAN IT Foundation, a nonprofit created in memory of Logan Matthew Kushner.

Tickets for the raffle are available now through Nov. 5, when the boat, valued at more than $150,000, will be given away to one lucky winner during the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show.

Entrants can purchase a $40 raffle ticket or three for $100 online. The winning ticket will be announced on Nov. 5 at 1 p.m. at the show. Entrants do not have to be present to win. Tickets can be purchased at the Project Boat Rallyup website.

Taco Marine Project Boat, featured on Ship Shape TV, chronicles the two-year remodeling process of a 1989 Pursuit 2650 powerboat to 2017 standards using new and advanced materials and products.

Contributions and the support of more than 40 marine manufacturers and suppliers make the project possible.

The raffle drawing is slated for live-streaming on Taco Marine’s Facebook page. Entrants can also purchase tickets in person at the Taco Marine Project Boat booth at the Tampa Boat Show (Oct. 13-15) or the Fort Lauderdale show (Nov. 1-5).

Media and the marine industry are invited to share information about the Project Boat Raffle Fundraiser on web sites and social media, along with the hashtags #imloganit and #projectboat and various images provided.

Since 2012, the I’m Logan It Foundation has raised more than $150,000 for charity, providing college scholarships to deserving students and support to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

Click here to learn more.

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