Northern Lights adds Louisiana office - Trade Only Today

Northern Lights adds Louisiana office

The branch will employ a full-time sales, parts and service staff and will warehouse marine, industrial and commercial series products.
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Northern Lights, a marine power generation and climate control products manufacturer, will open its fifth branch office, in Kenner, La., early next year to enhance service to Gulf of Mexico and inland waterways boatbuilders and vessel operators.

The new branch will employ a full-time sales, parts and service staff and will warehouse marine, industrial and commercial series products. It will provide service to customers in the Gulf and all navigable inland waterways in the Midwest and eastern regions of the United States.

Important ports, including New Orleans, Houston, Pensacola, Fla., and Paducah, Ky., will be in the branch service area.

“Brown water operators face challenges and opportunities that are unique in the marine industry,” Northern Lights vice president and general manager Brian Vesely said in a statement.

“They contend with emission and competition requirements that deserve a focused, customer-driven response. With the opening of NL Gulf, we are solidifying our commitment to providing the industry’s best support to this important marketplace.”

Rick Stinson was appointed NL Gulf branch manager. The company said Stinson has decades of experience in the Gulf and inland waterways boating community, having spent the prior 20 years as sales manager for Thrustmaster of Texas in support of sales and market development in the Gulf of Mexico, the East Coast and inland waterways.

He has more than 38 years of combined experience in the marine industry, including sales for Schottel propulsion systems, sales management for Iveco Aifo, distribution for Volvo Penta Marine and yard management for the original Halter Marine Group.

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