Vetus unveils electric propulsion unit

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The Vetus E-Pod can be mounted on the bottom of a boat to provide propulsion.

The Vetus E-Pod can be mounted on the bottom of a boat to provide propulsion.

At the Miami International Boat Show this week, Vetus will unveil its E-Pod a compact electric propulsion unit for power and sail boats up to 25 feet long.

The 7.5-kW E-Pod operates silently and mounts under the stern of a boat. Because it’s self-contained, it requires no shaft and it takes up minimal space inside the boat. Once the unit’s installed, the wiring harness is run to the controls that can be placed wherever the operator wants them in the boat.

“As the company who created the first electric propulsion solution 20 years ago with our EP2200, Vetus is excited to now develop its new technology further with the introduction of the E-Pod,” Chris DeBoy, Vetus Maxwell vice president of sales and marketing said in a statement. “This competed electric propulsion package is not only very efficient, but also environmentally friendly, plus it offers simple alignment and installation with minimal maintenance. With the complete unit residing beneath the boat and no shafts or rotating parts, boat owners will have more room left inside their boat.”

The E-Pod can be supplied as part of system that includes thrusters and steering components. 

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