Win-tron sponsors New York-to-Bermuda record attempt

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When Chuck Arnold, Northeast sales manager for Contender Boats, takes off from Manhattan in a stepped-hull version of the new Contender 37 center console for a late-spring high-speed record run to Bermuda, he'll be carrying a full complement of electronics, underwater lighting and other gear supplied by Win-tron Electronics, the company announced.

"Chuck Arnold, who is a well-known and respected industry pro, came to me with some tough parameters for his upcoming adventure," said Edward Winder, president of Win-tron Electronics, who will be one of three passengers accompanying Arnold on the run.

"He plans to run his boat at 44 knots from the Statue of Liberty to Bermuda non-stop. The boat, the three people in it and the navigational system all will be tested to their capable limits and there will be little room for error," Winder added.

The goal of Arnold's offshore bid is not only to break the current New York-to-Bermuda crossing record, which stands at 29 hours, 30 minutes, but also to demonstrate the solid, high-performance characteristics of Contender's 37 center console, as well as the electronics and other equipment carried on board.

"This kind of trip places maximum demands on everyone on board, as well as the equipment needed to accomplish the task," Arnold said in a statement. "We knew we could count on Win-tron Electronics to provide us with the best electronics systems on the market to help ensure our success."

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