Yamaha Marine Group donates outboard to conversation group

The Yamaha Marine Group said it expanded its conservation efforts to support the Center for Coastal Studies in Provincetown, Mass.
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The Yamaha Marine Group said it expanded its conservation efforts to support the Center for Coastal Studies in Provincetown, Mass., with the donation of a 300-hp outboard.

Along with another F300 donation from Napi Van Dereck, the owner of Napi’s restaurant in Provincetown, and a rigging and labor donation from Nauset Marine in Orleans, Mass., the outboards will repower the twin-engine Ibis, a whale disentanglement vessel used to assist with several research and rescue programs in the Cape Cod Bay area.

The Center for Coastal Studies focuses on humpback whale science, conservation and stewardship, as well as right whales, one of the world’s most endangered large whales (the current population is about 500).

The organization also heads the Marine Animal Entanglement Response program, which helps to disentangle protected marine species along the East Coast and educate responders around the world.

“North Atlantic right whales have returned to Cape Cod Bay in record numbers this year, and the donation of these outboards comes at a critical time. Disentangling wild marine animals at sea is a daunting task, and Yamaha has already made the task that much easier,” Marine Animal Entanglement Response team director Scott Landry said in a statement.

“Throughout the year the team will be called out to help right, humpback, fin and minke whales, as well as leatherback sea turtles, which have been caught in fishing gear and marine debris,” Landry said. “The reliability and efficiency of Yamaha engines will give our team peace of mind far from shore and under difficult circumstances."

“We are pleased to support the Center for Coastal Studies in its disentanglement efforts at this particular time as the number of marine mammals rises in Cape Cod Bay. Yamaha Marine holds steadfast to principles of conservation and stewardship of all marine resources, as codified in our code of ethics,” Yamaha senior communications manager Martin Peters said. “The center joins our other efforts in promoting conservation at organizations such as Ocearch, Pacific Marine Mammal Center, National Aquarium and the Clearwater Marine Aquarium.”

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