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Boater in Lake Lanier crash to serve 30 months in prison

The man who caused a fatal lake crash that killed two Georgia brothers was acquitted of vehicular homicide charges Thursday afternoon.

Paul Bennett was found guilty of boating under the influence, reckless operation of a vessel and failure to render aid in the crash that killed the Prince brothers in June 2012, according to the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Bennett, 45, of Cumming, Ga., was sentenced to 30 months in prison, followed by 18 months on probation and 400 hours of community service. He has no more boating privileges in Georgia and must undergo drug and alcohol evaluations, a Hall County judge ruled.

Bennett was accused of driving drunk when his boat collided with a pontoon boat on Lake Lanier about 10:30 p.m. on June 18, 2012. The Prince family of five was among 13 people on the pontoon at the time of the crash, which sent the two youngest Prince brothers, Jake, 9, and Griffin, 13, into the lake.

Bennett was arrested the day after the crash and charged with boating under the influence. Several weeks later, charges against Bennett were upgraded to include homicide by vessel, failure to render aid and reckless operation of a vessel.

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